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Filet Tutorial

Filet crochet basics
Starting your work
Checkmark mesh
Increasing
Decreasing
Working borders
Finishing your work
'Cut' edges

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CROCHET TUTORIAL

Chart Abbreviations:

- dc;

- chain

  - sc

Working borders around your work.
(LESSON 5)

Look at the photos above. The left photo shows the piece of work without border around, the right photo - the same piece, but with border. The right one looks much neater, doesn't it?

To work a border after you finish your project, don't fasten off, don't turn your work and start working single crochet in each mesh around entire model counter clockwise. Your starting mesh is the last mesh of your project and you finish your border in the same mesh, as shown on the figure below.

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If your project is square or rectangle, start with 2sc in starting mesh, then 2sc in each side mesh, and 5sc in three corner meshes. Finish with 3sc in starting mesh, sl st in first sc. The figure below shows the example of such project.

wpe16.jpg (4238 bytes)

Remember, that you are supposed to work sc in space of meshes.

To help you understand better, here are some charts.

If your project has open meshes along the edges, work:
in space of last dc of your work (corner dc) - 2sc;
on the left and right edges -  2sc in space of each last dc or ch5 of rows;
on the top and bottom edges - 2sc in space of each ch2;
in three corner meshes - 5sc in space of ch2 and corner dc or ch5;
finish with 2sc in space of ch2, 1sc in space of corner dc, sl st in first sc.

>>>- this is how this fragment may look on the scheme.

If your project has filled meshes along the edges, work:
in space of last dc of your work (corner dc) - 2sc;
on the left and right edges -  2sc in space of each last dc or ch3 of rows;
on the top and bottom edges - 2sc in 2dc, skip one dc, 2sc in next 2dc and so on;
in three corner meshes - 2sc in 2dc, 3sc in space of corner dc or ch3;
finish with 2sc in 2dc, 1sc in space of corner dc, sl st in first sc.

>>>- this is how this fragment may look on the scheme.

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If your project is oval, round or any other shape with increasing and decreasing, start with 2sc in starting mesh, then 2sc in each side mesh, and 5sc in each corner mesh of your project (i.e. the meshes formed by increasing or decreasing). Finish with 3sc in starting mesh, sl st in first sc. The figure below shows the example of such project.

This chart shows you how to work border around a project with both corner and side meshes (when you don't increase or decrease constantly).

>>> - this is how this fragment may look on the scheme.

This chart shows you how to work border around a project with all corner meshes (when you increase or decrease constantly).

>>> - this is how this fragment may look on the scheme.

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If your project is a diamond or any other shape with increasing, decreasing and four top stand-alone meshes, start with 2sc in starting top mesh, 2sc in each side mesh, 5sc in each corner mesh of your project (i.e. the meshes formed by increasing or decreasing) and 8sc in three top meshes (not counting the first one, i.e. the one you've started with). Finish with 6sc in starting mesh, sl st in first sc. The figure below shows the example of such project.

This chart shows you how to work border around a project with four top stand-alone meshes (when you don't increase or decrease constantly).

>>> - this is how this fragment may look on the scheme.

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Here are some tips on working borders:

1. If you tend to crochet tight, work borders with a larger hook, otherwise your work may shrink. If you tend to crochet loose, take a smaller hook for borders.

2. If you want your edges to look more round (if your project is oval or round, for example) you may work 4sc, or even 3sc in corner meshes. This will give a round shape to your work.

3. Always start with 2sc in first starting mesh. After your round of border is done, this is how you figure out how to finish it in starting mesh:
if you've worked 5sc in corner meshes - work 3sc in starting mesh at the end;
if you've worked 4sc in corner meshes - work 2sc in starting mesh at the end;
if you've worked 3sc in corner meshes - work 1sc in starting mesh at the end;

Finish with sl st in first sc.

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And, as usual, a little exercise at the end. We'll work border around this little diamond:

>>> - this is how this project looks like on the scheme.

It contains four top and four corner meshes.

Crochet this little fragment according to the scheme. Don't fasten off, don't turn. Continue working counter clockwise around the project:
2sc in space of  last open mesh of the project (i.e. the one you've finished your work with - first top mesh);
5sc in space of next (first) corner mesh;
8sc in space of next (second) top mesh;
5sc in space of next (second) corner mesh;
8sc in space of next (second) top mesh;
5sc in space of next (third) corner mesh;
8sc in space of next (third) top mesh;
5sc in space of next (third) corner mesh;
8sc in space of next (fourth) top mesh;
5sc in space of next (fourth) corner mesh;
Finish with 6sc in space of starting (first) top mesh, sl st in first sc. Fasten off.

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I've showed you how to work the simple border around any crochet project.
You can work much more complicated border, of course. In this case consider it as a "foundation  row". After this you may work more rows of "regular" crochet ornaments around your filet projects. I use this technique very often. Take a look at my table runners, for example. Don't those look much better with borders around rather than just "plain" rectangle filet?

The regular crochet borders around filet projects are very refreshing. Not to mention that it's a challenge to mix filet and regular crochet in one project! You can use the regular crochet edging patterns as a motif for your border.

Even more - you can work borders in another color! Take a look at my bookmarks. Though filet crochet is hard (I would say impossible) to work in colors, this is your chance to make your filet project multicolor.

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We are done with this lesson. In my next lesson I'll explain you how to finish your work after you are done crocheting. This is also an essential part of the final look of your project.

Happy crocheting!

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